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Descriptive analysis of the Compliance Department in the Pharmaceutical Industry in Spain

| News | Corporate Compliance

Jose Ignacio Olleros and nine other members of the Pharmaceutical Sector Working Group (GTSF) of the Spanish Association of Compliance (ASCOM) analyze the profile map of the Compliance Officer in the Pharmaceutical Industry in Spain in an article published by the Spanish Journal of Economics Of the health

José Ignacio Olleros, partner of Andersen Tax & Legal participates with nine other members of the Pharmaceutical Sector Working Group (GTSF) of the Spanish Association of Compliance (ASCOM) in the Descriptive Analysis of the Compliance Department in the Pharmaceutical Industry in Spain.

The group, aware of the importance of establishing a homogeneous profile for the figure of a Compliance Officer (CO), analyses through a survey of 70 pharmaceutical companies the map of the profile of the Compliance Officer in the Pharmaceutical Industry (IF) in Spain.

The analysis provides valuable information on the "current status of the Compliance function in the Pharmaceutical Industry with a view to working in the future on how the profile of the Compliance Officer in the Pharmaceutical Industry evolves and thus the function of the Compliance department".

"The IF is exposed to criminal risks common to all sectors, as well as in the laws of origin of multinational business groups operating in national territory" and the compliance department is responsible for ensuring that companies operate with integrity and that their activities and businesses are carried out "in accordance with current regulations and established internal policies and procedures".

According to this study, and following the conclusions reached by the authors after analysing the responses of those surveyed, the profile of the Compliance Officer in the Pharmaceutical Industry sector in Spain has a different profile with respect to other sectors. He has a degree in health sciences, has been in this position for less than five years and works in a pharmaceutical laboratory of between 1,000 and 10,000 employees with a double report: local and international.

This is an appropriate profile, although the group points out that there are "improvements to be made". These include: the need for greater independence of the Compliance Officer from local GAOs. The separation of this figure with other departments such as 'Legal' or 'Regulatory' in order to have the independence it needs to carry out its function and avoid potential situations of conflict of interest between them. Finally, they consider that a truly independent function should report directly to the Board of Directors and not to the General Management of an organization.

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